It’s been ages since this website was properly updated- a new design and lots of new stuff is on the way next week!  Patterns and foam are still available in the store, and jewelry will be going up soon as well- though commissions and custom fukus will no longer be available after 11/01/14 .

Making Wigs (and wig fibers) Less Shiny Tutorial!  I’m not sure how useful people will find this, but I’ve used it a lot so I may as well share in the hopes that it’s useful to someone else!
Sometimes you buy wigs and extensions and they’re lovely and nothing needs to be done to them – places like Arda Wigs already have fantastic fibers on their wigs.  However, I like to get a lot of my wig supplies from my local Beauty Supply Store (er, that’s actually the name of it) downtown.  It’s just so convenient, inexpensive, and I don’t have to wait for stuff to arrive in the mail.  The downside to this is that a lot of their extensions are really obnoxiously shiny and plastic-y looking.  They have that undeniable PARTY WIG look about them.  And that is an awful thing.
So here’s how I take care of it!  First, brush out your wig or extensions to get rid of tangles- then fill a bowl or bucket (I think I used a vase in these photos) with liquid fabric softener.  You don’t need any sort of fancy fabric softener- just pick some up from the dollar store and you’ll be fine.  Submerge your wig/extensions in the fabric softener and swish them around a bit to make sure that they’re fully coated in the stuff – then leave them to stew in that for about a week.

When the week is up, rinse your wig/extensions in cold/lukewarm water (don’t use soap!).  Hang them up to dry.  Once dry, shake baby powder/talcum powder onto the wig/extensions and brush through- applying more powder as you feel necessary.  The fabric softener takes away a bit of the shine and also helps the powder to stick to the wig fibers and mute the obnoxious shine.  Style however you want, applying more powder if you feel it’s needed.

I did this on my Leia extensions so that they matched my own hair better (since… my real hair is not QUITE as shiny as a party wig), and also on my Sailor Moon ponytails since they were originally very very shiny!  I’ve used it on a few other wigs and sets of extensions and like the way it makes the fibers look more natural and less shiny.

(download the image to view properly- it’s a bit large…)

 

Custom fukus are still available through the store- though the format for ordering has changed slightly.  Go check out the page here if you’re interested!  As I mentioned before, the prices on them have gone up due to how much time they take to make.  If you’d rather make your own, I finally completed the pattern for classic and regular style fukus and it’s up for sale here!

 

EDIT:  Eternal Fuku Patterns should be up by mid March- I’ve been so busy lately I haven’t had time to iron out the details on them!  I will make another post when they become available.

I realize I already posted this on both my Facebook page and Twitter, but as this is my… uh… home base?  I should post it here too.

As it says- the price of custom fukus is going to be going up on February 1st!  Anyone ordering before the first will receive the current (lower) price.

As a side note, I’ve opened up a little shop on Etsy which has pretty much the same things as my shop here (minus the full costumes- which are only available through my website).  That can be found here.

There’s some new stuff in the shops but mostly I’ve just been working on commissions lately.  I’ll be at Katsucon in February with some new costumes so please come have a drink with me or just hang out or whatever IT’LL BE SO FUN.  I haven’t been to a convention in over a year and I’m beside myself excited about it.

Maybe not so much of a tutorial, but details on how I put together a lot of my shoes for costumes.

I usually use pleather shoes for most costumes because I love the way they look!  Also, they accept paint easily.  So that helps.

There are some awesome options available for painting leather (and faux leather/pleather), but for the longest time I didn’t know about them and I just used acrylic paint and mod podge to color shoes.  It’s cheap, readily available, and I could mix pretty much any color I needed so that the shoes would match my costume.  Generally two-three coats of paint and one coat of mod podge is enough to cover the whole shoe.
The downside to using acrylic is that it can crack (particularly if you use it on tall boots, or anything which needs to flex a lot when you wear it).

For shoes that have extra straps (like Neptune’s and Uranus’s) I cut pieces of pleather, painted them, and sewed them to the shoes.  For Neptune’s I sewed a loop  of elastic to one end of the ankle strap and a button to the inside of the shoe that the loop hooks over.

I hope that helps someone!  I promise, having the strap on Neptune’s shoe match the rest of the shoe looks a lot nicer than using ribbon, and only takes a little bit more time to add on.

As a final note- there are paints made specifically for changing the color of shoes.  Angelus leather paint and Meltonian Nu-Life spray are two that I would absolutely recommend!  For any sort of boots, or shoe with a lot of movement the result is going to last longer using those paints rather than acrylic.

Fuku Foam
Hair Clips
Pearl Hair Clips
Odango Covers
Custom Fuku
Classic Pattern
Super Pattern
Eternal Pattern
Omni Pattern
Sailor Moon
Pixie
Catwoman
Myu Mercury
Serenity
Coloring Shoes
Fandom Shoes
Fuku Sleeves
Tiaras